Skip to Content

High School Dropout Rates

High School Dropout Rates

Please note:

Event dropout rates are defined to be the number of youth ages 15-24 who dropped out of grades 10-12 in the year proceeding October 2000.

Table 1. - Event dropout rates and number and distribution of 15- through 24-year-olds who dropped out of grades 10-12, by background characteristics: October 2000

Characteristic

Event dropout rate(percent)

Numberof eventdropouts(thousands)

Populationenrolled(thousands)

Percent of alldropouts

Percent of
population enrolled

   Total

4.8

488

10,126

100.0

100.0

  Sex

   Male

5.5

280

5,087

57.4

50.2

   Female

4.1

208

5,039

42.6

49.8

  Race/ethnicity1

   White, non-Hispanic

4.1

276

6,786

56.6

67.0

   Black, non-Hispanic

6.1

91

1,510

18.6

14.9

   Hispanic

7.4

100

1,351

20.5

13.3

   Asian/Pacific Islander

3.5

13

379

2.7

3.7

  Family income2

   Low income

10.0

141

1,408

28.9

13.9

   Middle income

5.2

298

5,728

61.1

56.6

   High income

1.6

48

2,990

9.9

29.5

  Age3

   15 - 16

2.9

84

2,924

17.2

28.9

   17

3.5

121

3,452

24.8

34.1

   18

6.1

165

2,721

33.8

26.9

   19

9.6

70

724

14.3

7.1

   20 through 24

16.1

49

305

10.0

3.0

  Region

   Northeast

3.9

73

1,849

15.0

18.3

   Midwest

4.4

109

2,481

22.3

24.5

   South

6.2

220

3,543

45.1

35.0

   West

3.8

86

2,253

17.6

22.2

1. Due to small sample sizes, American Indians/Alaska Natives are included in the total but are not shown separately.
2. Low income is defined as the bottom 20 percent of all family incomes for 2000; middle income is between 20 and 80 percent of all family incomes; and high income is the top 20 percent of all family incomes. See appendix D of this report for a full definition of family income.
3. Age when a person dropped out may be 1 year younger, because the dropout event could occur at any time over \a 12-month period.
NOTE: Because of rounding, detail may not add to totals.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Current Population Survey, October 2000

Table copied from:  National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education, Dropout Rates in the United States:  2000

Site:  http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2002/droppub_2001/

http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2002/droppub_2001/tables/table1.asp

Please note:

Status dropout rates are defined to be the number of youth ages 16-24 who are not in school and have not completed a high school credential.

Table 2. - Status dropout rates and number and distribution of dropouts of 16- through 24-year-olds, by background characteristics: October 2000

Characteristic

Status dropout rate (percent)

Number
of status
dropouts
(thousands)

Population
(thousands)

Percent of all
dropouts

Percent of
population

   Total

10.9

3,776

34,568

100.0

100.0

  Sex

   Male

12.0

2,082

17,402

55.1

50.3

   Female

9.9

1,694

17,166

44.9

49.7

  Race/ethnicity1

   White, non-Hispanic

6.9

1,564

22,574

41.4

65.3

   Black, non-Hispanic

13.1

663

5,058

17.6

14.6

   Hispanic

27.8

1,456

–>5,237

38.6

15.1

   Asian/Pacific Islander

3.8

54

–>1,417

1.4

4.1

  Age

   16

3.9

152

3,887

4.1

11.2

   17

7.6

307

4,023

8.1

11.6

   18

11.6

468

4,019

12.4

11.6

   19

13.5

544

4,026

14.4

11.6

   20 through 24

12.4

2,304

18,613

61.0

53.8

   Recency of immigration

 Born outside the 50 States
 and District of Columbia

   Hispanic

44.2

1,007

2,282

26.7

6.6

   Non-Hispanic

7.4

140

1,907

3.7

5.5

 First Generation2

   Hispanic

14.6

244

1,669

6.5

4.8

   Non-Hispanic

4.6

84

1,837

2.2

5.3

 Second generation
 or more3

   Hispanic

15.9

205

1,286

5.4

3.7

   Non-Hispanic

8.2

2,096

25,586

55.5

74.0

  Region

   Northeast

8.5

504

5,945

13.3

17.2

   Midwest

9.2

741

8,058

19.6

23.3

   South

12.9

1,597

12,337

42.3

35.7

   West

11.3

933

8,228

24.7

23.8

1. Due to small sample sizes, American Indians/Alaska Natives are included in the total but are not shown separately.
2. Individuals defined as "first generation" were born in the 50 states or the District of Columbia, and one or both of their parents were born outside the 50 states or the District of Columbia.
3. Individuals defined as "second generation or more" were born in the 50 states or the District of Columbia, as were both of their parents.
NOTE: Because of rounding, detail may not add to totals.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Commerce, U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, October 2000.

Table copied from:  National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education, Dropout Rates in the United States:  2000

Site:  http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2002/droppub_2001/

http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2002/droppub_2001/tables/table3.asp

Facts at a glance:

  • 9% of teens age 16-19 were not in school and were not working in 2000
  • 11% of teens age 16-19 dropped out of school in 2000

Source: The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy

Site:  www.teenpregnancy.org/america/default.asp

For State and Local Data on Dropout Rates check out the following:

National Center for Education Statistics

http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2002/droppub_2001/

Go to http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2002/droppub_2001/tables/table2.aspThis provides info on the event dropout rates for each state during the 93-94 through 98-99 school years.

The Annie E. Casey Foundation

http://www.aecf.org

For quick-to-find census data of dropout rates in your state, county, and other local regions, go to http://www.aecf.org/kidscount/census/ and click on “profiles” and then follow the instructions. 

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy

www.teenpregnancy.org/america/default.asp

This site has state data on idle youth and school dropouts.  Click on “demographic data.”

For more up-to-date information, try looking up your local school district’s website or your state school board association’s website.  They may have dropout rates posted; and, at the very least, they should have contact information so that you can call and ask to see if they have records of dropout rates.